Latest

MVR or MvR may refer to:

Contents

1 Codes
2 Organizations
3 Science and technology
4 Miscellaneous

Codes[edit]

the ISO 4217 currency code for Maldivian rufiyaa, the currency of the Maldives
the IATA airport designator of Salak Airport, serving Maroua, Far North Province, Cameroon
the ICAO airline designator of Maverick Airways, Denver, Colorado, USA
the ISO 639-3 language code of the Marau language, spoken in the central-western part of the Yapen island and nearby isle of Cenderawasih Bay, Indonesian Papua (see also: Yapen languages)
the mnemonic of the “Move Remainder” operation code in IBM RPG II programming language

Organizations[edit]

Fifth Republic Movement (Spanish: Movimiento V [Quinta] República), a Venezuelan political party
Transports Montreux–Vevey–Riviera, a Swiss railway operator
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Rock Island District, one of six Districts comprising the Mississippi Valley Division

Science and technology[edit]

Mobile Virtual Reality.
Mechanical vapor recompression, a vapor compression process in which the compression is performed by a mechanically driven device (e.g. compressor)
Multicast VLAN Registration, routing packets received from a multicast source VLAN to one or more receive VLANs, thus saving upload bandwidth.

Miscellaneous[edit]

Market Value Reduction, a mechanism used by an insurance company to adjust life insurance policy withdrawal payments
Meon Valley Railway, a former (1903–1968) cross-country railway in Hampshire, England
Moors Valley Railway
Motor Vehicle Record

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title MVR.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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2001–02 ISU Junior Grand Prix

Type:
ISU Junior Grand Prix

Season:
2001–02

Navigation

Previous:
2000–01 ISU Junior Grand Prix

Next:
2002–03 ISU Junior Grand Prix

The 2001–02 ISU Junior Grand Prix was the fifth season of the ISU Junior Grand Prix, a series of international junior level competitions organized by the International Skating Union. It was the junior-level complement to the Grand Prix of Figure Skating, which was for senior-level skaters. Skaters competed in the disciplines of men’s singles, ladies’ singes, pair skating, and ice dancing. The top skaters from the series met at the Junior Grand Prix Final.

Contents

1 Competitions
2 Series notes
3 Junior Grand Prix Final qualifiers
4 Medals table
5 Medalists

5.1 Men
5.2 Ladies
5.3 Pairs
5.4 Ice dancing

6 References
7 External links

Competitions[edit]
The locations of the JGP events change yearly. In the 2001–02 season, the series was composed of the following events:

Date
Event
Location

September 13–16
2001 JGP Sofia Cup
Sofia, Bulgaria

September 20–23
2001 JGP Phoenix (cancelled)
Phoenix, Arizona, USA

September 27–30
2001 JGP Czech Skate
Ostrava, Czech Republic

October 11–14
2001 JGP Gdańsk
Gdańsk, Poland

October 25–28
2001 JGP The Hague
The Hague, Netherlands

November 1–4
2001 JGP Salchow Trophy
Malmö, Sweden

November 8–11
2001 JGP Trofeo Rita Trapanese
Milan, Italy

November 15–18
2001 JGP SBC Cup
Nagano, Japan

December 13–16
2001–02 Junior Grand Prix Final
Bled, Slovenia

Series notes[edit]
Following the September 11, 2001 attacks, the United States Figure Skating Association cancelled the Junior Grand Prix event to be held in Arizona and did not allow their skaters to compete on the Junior Grand Prix for the rest of the season.[1]
Junior Grand Prix Final qualifiers[edit]
The following skaters qualified for the 2001–02 Junior Grand Prix Final, in order of qualification.[2][3][4][5]

Men
Ladies
Pairs
Ice dancing

1
Stanislav Timchenko
Miki Ando
Zhang Dan / Zhang Hao
Elena Romanovskaya / Alexander Grachev

2
Andrei Griazev
Irina Tkatchuk
Clara Montgomery / Ryan Arnold
Elena Khaliavina / Maxim Shabalin

3
Daisuke Takahashi
Akiko Suzuki
Julia Karbovskaya / Sergei Slavnov
Julia Golovina / Oleg Voiko

4
Kevin van der Perren
Ludmila Nelidina
Julia Shapiro / Dmitri Khromin
Oksana Domnina / Maxim Bolotine

5
Shawn Sawyer
Tatiana Basova
Maria Mukhortova / Pavel Lebedev
Miriam Steinel / Vladimir Tsve
천사티비

Rotary variable capacitor

A variable capacitor is a capacitor whose capacitance may be intentionally and repeatedly changed mechanically or electronically. Variable capacitors are often used in L/C circuits to set the resonance frequency, e.g. to tune a radio (therefore it is sometimes called a tuning capacitor or tuning condenser), or as a variable reactance, e.g. for impedance matching in antenna tuners.

Contents

1 Mechanically controlled capacitance
2 Special forms of mechanically variable capacitors

2.1 Multiple sections
2.2 Butterfly
2.3 Split stator
2.4 Differential

3 History
4 Electronically controlled capacitance

4.1 Voltage tuned capacitance
4.2 Digitally tuned capacitance

5 Transducers
6 Notes
7 References
8 External links

Mechanically controlled capacitance[edit]

Principle of the rotary variable capacitor

In mechanically controlled variable capacitors, the distance between the plates, or the amount of plate surface area which overlaps, can be changed.
The most common form arranges a group of semicircular metal plates on a rotary axis (“rotor”) that are positioned in the gaps between a set of stationary plates (“stator”) so that the area of overlap can be changed by rotating the axis. Air or plastic foils can be used as dielectric material. By choosing the shape of the rotary plates, various functions of capacitance vs. angle can be created, e.g. to obtain a linear frequency scale. Various forms of reduction gear mechanisms are often used to achieve finer tuning control, i.e. to spread the variation of capacity over a larger angle, often several turns.

Measurement of the capacitance of a rotary capacitor

Cmin = 20 pF

C = 269 pF

Cmax = 520 pF

A vacuum variable capacitor uses a set of plates made from concentric cylinders that can be slid in or out of an opposing set of cylinders[1] (sleeve and plunger). These plates are then sealed inside of a non-conductive envelope such as glass or ceramic and placed under a high vacuum. The movable part (plunger) is mounted on a flexible metal membrane that seals and maintains the vacuum. A screw shaft is attached to the plunger, when the shaft is turned the plunger moves in or out of the sleeve and the value of the capacitor changes. The vacuum not only increases the working voltage and current handling capacity of the capacitor it also greatly reduces the chance of arcing across the plates. The most common usage for vacuum variables are in high
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Route 315

Route information

Maintained by Transports Québec

Length:
76.6 km[1] (47.6 mi)

Major junctions

South end:
Route 148 in Gatineau (Masson-Angers)

 
A-50 in Gatineau (Masson-Angers)
Route 309 in Gatineau (Buckingham)
Route 321 in Chénéville

North end:
Route 323 in Namur

Location

Counties:
Gatineau / Papineau

Major cities:
Gatineau

Highway system

Quebec provincial highways

← Route 311

Route 317 →

Route 315 through Chénéville.

Route 315 is a road in the Canadian province of Quebec that connects the Gatineau sector of Masson-Angers to Namur. Initially, the road started in Buckingham on Rue Joseph at the city’s Main Street (Avenue de Buckingham) just a few kilometres further north, but when A-50 was extended further east as a Buckingham by-pass at its current end at Doherty Road, the section of Route 309 between Buckingham and the junction at Route 148 in Masson-Angers was renumbered Route 315 while Route 309 starts at Doherty Road and A-50.
The section of Route 315 between Mulgrave-et-Derry and Ripon is unpaved and windy.

Contents

1 Municipalities along Route 315
2 Major intersections
3 See also
4 References
5 External links

Municipalities along Route 315[edit]

Gatineau – (Masson-Angers / Buckingham)
Mayo
Mulgrave-et-Derry
Ripon
Montpellier
Lac-Simon
Chénéville
Namur

Major intersections[edit]

RCM or ET
Municipality
km
Junction
Notes

Southern terminus of Route 315

Gatineau
Masson-Angers
0.0
Route 148
148 WEST: to Gatineau
148 EAST: to Lochaber-Partie-Ouest

0.6
1.9
A-50
50 EAST: to Buckingham
50 WEST: to Gatineau

Buckingham
8.2
Route 309
309 SOUTH: to A-50
309 NORTH: to L’Ange-Gardien

Papineau
Ripon
48.7
Chemin Montpellier
EAST: to Route 317

Chénéville
65.1
Route 321
321 SOUTH: to Ripon
321 NORTH: to Duhamel

Namur
76.6
Route 323
323 SOUTH: to Notre-Dame-de-la-Paix
323 NORTH: to Saint-Émile-de-Suffolk

Northern terminus of Route 315

See also[edit]

List of Quebec provincial highways

References[edit]

^ Ministère des transports, “Distances routières”, page 96, Les Publications du Québec, 2005

External links[edit]

Official Transports Quebec Map (French)
Route 315 on Google Maps

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Provincial Secondary Highways in Quebec (300-series)

301
303
307
309
311
315
317
321
323
325
327
329
333
335
337
338
339
340
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
350
351
352
354
358
359
360
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
368

밤헌터

Simon J. Liebowitz (June 5, 1905 – May 24, 1998) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.
Life[edit]
He was born on June 5, 1905,[1] in Brooklyn, New York City. He attended Public School No. 129 and Boys High School.[2] He graduated from the City College of New York, and from Brooklyn Law School in 1926. He practiced law in New York City. He married Esther Nitzburg and together they had two children. They remained married until Esther’s death at age 43. He thereafter married Elsie Chasanoff (1908–2007), who was a widow and had one daughter and together they formed a new family with all three of their offspring.
Liebowitz was a member of the New York State Senate from 1960 to 1968, sitting in the 172nd, 173rd, 174th, 175th, 176th and 177th New York State Legislatures.
In November 1968, he was elected to the New York City Civil Court; and in November 1969, to the New York Supreme Court. He remained on the bench until the end of 1975 when he reached the constitutional age limit. Afterwards he resumed the practice of law and remained active in various capacities of the law until his death.
He died on May 24, 1998, in Good Samaritan Hospital in Palm Beach, Florida.[3]
Sources[edit]

^ “LIEBOWITZ, SIMON I.” at Social Security Info
^ New York Red Book (1965–1966; pg. 80)
^ Simon J. Liebowitz, Ex-Judge And New York Legislator, 92 in the New York Times on May 27, 1998

New York State Senate

Preceded by
Herbert I. Sorin
New York State Senate
10th District
1960–1965
Succeeded by
Irving Mosberg

Preceded by
Edward S. Lentol
New York State Senate
18th District
1966
Succeeded by
William C. Thompson

Preceded by
Martin J. Knorr
New York State Senate
15th District
1967–1968
Succeeded by
A. Frederick Meyerson

밤헌터

Diplocheilichthys

Diplocheilichthys pleurotaenia

Scientific classification

Kingdom:
Animalia

Phylum:
Chordata

Class:
Actinopterygii

Order:
Cypriniformes

Family:
Cyprinidae

Genus:
karp)Diplocheilichthys
Bleeker, 1855

Diplocheilichthys is a genus of cyprinid fish consisting of two species, both of which are endemic to Indonesia.
Species[edit]

Diplocheilichthys jentinkii (Popta, 1904)
Diplocheilichthys pleurotaenia (Bleeker, 1855)

References[edit]

Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2011). Species of Diplocheilichthys in FishBase. August 2011 version.

This Cypriniformes-related article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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성인토렌트

Old Cokesbury and Masonic Female College and Conference School

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

U.S. Historic district

Show map of South Carolina

Show map of the US

Nearest city
Cokesbury, South Carolina, U.S.

Coordinates
34°17′11″N 82°13′00″W / 34.2864°N 82.2166°W / 34.2864; -82.2166Coordinates: 34°17′11″N 82°13′00″W / 34.2864°N 82.2166°W / 34.2864; -82.2166

Area
14,438 acres (5,843 ha)

Built
1824

Architect
Multiple

Architectural style
Greek Revival

NRHP Reference #
70000589[1]

Added to NRHP
August 25, 1970

The Masonic Female College and Cokesbury Conference School is a historic building in Cokesbury, South Carolina, that was the home of several different educational institutions in the century from 1854 to 1954. Together with the adjacent village of Old Cokesbury, it is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places as an historic district.[1][2][3]
When built in 1854, the school building was the home of the Masonic Female College of South Carolina, which was established in 1853 and operated until 1874 under the sponsorship of Bascomb Lodge No. 80 of Freemasons. The school was unusual for its time in providing an education for young women.[2][3]
From 1876 to 1918, the building was the site of the Cokesbury Conference School, a school for boys from 1876 to 1882, and co-educational thereafter. In 1918, it became a public school, and operated as such until 1954. In 1954 the property reverted to the South Carolina Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church.[2][3] The three-story Greek Revival style building has a bell tower and four square columns that extend from the ground level to the pediment. The first floor contained four student recitation rooms and four music rooms, there was a chapel on the second floor, and the third floor housed a Masonic Lodge headquarters.[2] The school building and Old Cokesbury were listed together on the National Register on August 25, 1970.[3]
References[edit]

^ a b National Park Service (2010-07-09). “National Register Information System”. National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 
^ a b c d Fant, Mrs. James W. (May 16, 1970). “Old Cokesbury, and Masonic Female College and Conference School” (pdf). National Register of Historic Places – Nomination and Inventory. Retrieved 14 July 2012. 
^ a b c d “Old Cokesbury and Masonic Female College and Confere
성인만화

For other ships with the same name, see USS White Plains.

History

United States

Name:
USS White Plains

Builder:
Kaiser Shipyards

Laid down:
11 February 1943

Launched:
27 September 1943

Commissioned:
15 November 1943

Decommissioned:
10 July 1946

Struck:
1 July 1958

Fate:
Sold for scrap on 29 July 1958

General characteristics

Class and type:
Casablanca-class escort carrier

Displacement:
10,400 tons

Length:
512 ft 3 in (156.13 m) overall

Beam:
65 ft 2 in (19.86 m), 108 ft (33 m) maximum width

Draft:
22 ft 6 in (6.86 m)

Propulsion:

2 × 5-cylinder reciprocating Skinner Uniflow engines
4 × 285 psi boilers
2 shafts
9,000 shp

Speed:
19.3 knots (35.7 km/h)

Range:
10,240 nmi (18,960 km) @ 15 kn (28 km/h)

Complement:

Total:910-916 officers and men

Embarked Squadron:50-56
Ship’s Crew:860

Armament:
1 × 5 in (127 mm)/38 cal dual purpose gun, 12 × Bofors 40 mm guns (8×2), 20 × 20 mm cannon]]s (20×1)

Aircraft carried:
24

Service record

Part of:
United States Pacific Fleet (1943-1946), Atlantic Reserve Fleet (1946-1958)

Operations:
Battle of Saipan, Battle of Leyte Gulf, Operation Magic Carpet

Awards:

Presidential Unit Citation
5 Battle stars

USS White Plains (CVE-66) was an Casablanca class escort carrier of the United States Navy.
She was laid down on 11 February 1943 at Vancouver, Washington, by the Kaiser Shipbuilding Company, Inc., under a Maritime Commission contract (MC hull 1103) as Elbour Bay (ACV-66); renamed White Plains on 3 April 1943; redesignated CVE-66 on 15 July 1943; launched on 27 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Marc A. Mitscher; delivered to the Navy on 15 November 1943 at Astoria, Oregon; and commissioned that same day, Captain Oscar A. Weller in command.

Contents

1 Service history

1.1 World War II

1.1.1 Battle of Leyte Gulf

1.2 Post-War

2 Awards
3 References
4 External links
5 Books
6 References

Service history[edit]
World War II[edit]
The USS White Plains completed her outfitting at Astoria, Oregon, on 4 December 1943, and then she began shakedown training on 8 December. At the conclusion of her initial cruise, the warship entered San Diego on 21 December. On 30 December, she returned to sea, bound for the Gilbert Islands. She arrived at Tarawa Atoll on 11 January 1944 and unloaded the aircraft she had transported. On 17 January, the ship headed back to Oahu, arriving in Pearl
도신

Lynn Chang

Lynn Chang (Chinese: 張萬鈞; pinyin: Zhāng Wànjūn) (born 1953) is a Chinese American violinist known for his work as both a soloist and a chamber musician. Chang is a founding member of the Boston Chamber Music Society and is currently a faculty member at MIT, Boston University, the Boston Conservatory, and the New England Conservatory of Music.[1]

Contents

1 Education
2 Career
3 Awards and honors
4 Recordings
5 References

Education[edit]
A native of Boston, Chang began his violin study at the age of seven with Sarah Scriven and Alfred Krips of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He continued his studies at the Juilliard School under the tutelage of Ivan Galamian, then went on to receive his bachelor’s degree from Harvard University.[2]
Career[edit]
Chang has appeared as a soloist with many of the world’s finest orchestras including the Miami Symphony Orchestra, Utah Symphony Orchestra, Oakland East Bay Symphony, Seattle Symphony Orchestra, Honolulu Symphony Orchestra, Beijing Symphony Orchestra, Taipei Symphony Orchestra, and Hong Kong Philharmonic among others. He has also performed with several notable musicians such as Yo-Yo Ma and Dawn Upshaw. Chang has also given many recitals throughout the United States and has performed in such halls as Davis Hall in San Francisco, Weill Hall in New York City, and the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Chang also makes frequent appearances at music festivals throughout the United States including the Killington Music Festival, Musicorda Festival, Wolf Trap, Great Woods Festival, Marlboro Festival, and the Tanglewood Music Festival.
Chang has also collaborated with members of the Juilliard String Quartet, Guarneri String Quartet, Tokyo String Quartet, Cleveland String Quartet, Vermeer String Quartet, Muir String Quartet and Orion String Quartet.[3]
Lynn Chang has led a busy and successful teaching career for over three decades. His former students now perform in such orchestras as the Chicago Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra in New York. His former student, Joseph Lin was recently named first violin of the Juilliard String Quartet. Chang also leads Hemenway Strings at The Boston Conservatory, a conductorless string chamber ensemble.
In 2008, Lynn Chang was elected to the Board of Overseers at Harvard University.
Awards and honors[edit]

Chang is a second prize winner at the International Paganini Competition.
Chang is a winner of the Concert Artists Gu
소라넷

Gloppefjorden

Gloppenfjorden

View of the fjord

Gloppefjorden

Location in Sogn og Fjordane county

Location
Nordfjord, Sogn og Fjordane

Coordinates
61°48′10″N 6°06′42″E / 61.8027°N 6.1116°E / 61.8027; 6.1116Coordinates: 61°48′10″N 6°06′42″E / 61.8027°N 6.1116°E / 61.8027; 6.1116

Primary inflows
Gloppeelva river

Primary outflows
Nordfjorden

Basin countries
Norway

Max. length
12 kilometres (7.5 mi)

Max. width
2.7 kilometres (1.7 mi)

Settlements
Sandane, Vereide, Sørstranda

Gloppefjorden or Gloppenfjorden is a fjord in Gloppen Municipality in Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. The 12-kilometre (7.5 mi) long fjord flows from the village of Sandane in the southeast to its mouth at the Nordfjorden in the northwest. The river Gloppeelva is the primary inflow on the fjord. The river comes from the large lake Breimsvatnet. The 2.7-kilometre (1.7 mi) wide fjord has a lot of settlements along the inner parts of the fjord, especially on the eastern side of the fjord. The most notable village areas are Sandane, Vereide, and Sørstranda. The European route E39 highway runs along the eastern side of the fjord. Sandane Airport, Anda is located near the mouth of the fjord.[1]
See also[edit]

List of Norwegian fjords

References[edit]

^ Store norske leksikon. “Gloppenfjorden” (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2013-10-23. 

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